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To Build A Home – The Cinematic Orchestra

15 Aug

Urgh, Monday morning. Sorry people, the weekend’s over. I wish I could tell you that we had a track for you today that would get you up and running again, and ready to face the world and the challenges it holds. I apologize, but today it’s time for soft reflection. The Cinematic Orchestra is a British jazz and electronic group, and while the band members come and go, the quality of the music remains unquestionably high. Take a listen to To Build A Home:

This track is gorgeous. It slowly builds and builds before climaxing with beautiful melodies and instrumentals. Not one to party to by any means, but definitely still worth having in your music library. Incidentally, this song has appeared in a handful of TV Shows and movies, so there’s a good chance you’ll recognize it. Check this performance out:

Tides – Nitin Sawhney

21 Jun

Here’s a nice and relaxing gem from Indian-British musician Nitin Sawhney. Having released eight studio albums to date, he has a massive range of material to choose from. I’ve picked Tides because it feels like it manages to juxtapose jazz and classical music really nicely, and as we all know, I love a good song to relax to.

So let that sink in and help you get through the rest of your week. It’s Tuesday. You can do it.

Comptine D’un Autre Été, L’apres-Midi – Yann Tiersen

12 Mar

You may have heard Yann Tiersen’s beautiful piano piece entitled Comptine D’un Autre Été, L’apres-Midi before. The song featured first in the French film Amélie, released in 2001. It then went on to get big international recognition and feature in Italian and German movies. If you have a particularly sharp ear, you may have picked up on the BBC using it in their programmes The Apprentice, and The Restaurant.

Pretty beautiful, huh? In my opinion it’s one of the best piano pieces out there. I know it’s a little down for the start of a weekend, but hey, everyone should hear this, and there’s absolutely no time like the present. My thoughts are with Japan.

Comptine D’un Autre Été, L’apres-Midi – Yann Tiersen

12 Mar

You may have heard Yann Tiersen’s beautiful piano piece entitled Comptine D’un Autre Été, L’apres-Midi before. The song featured first in the French film Amélie, released in 2001. It then went on to get big international recognition and feature in Italian and German movies. If you have a particularly sharp ear, you may have picked up on the BBC using it in their programmes The Apprentice, and The Restaurant.

Pretty beautiful, huh? In my opinion it’s one of the best piano pieces out there. I know it’s a little down for the start of a weekend, but hey, everyone should hear this, and there’s absolutely no time like the present. My thoughts are with Japan.

Comptine D’un Autre Été, L’apres-Midi – Yann Tiersen

12 Mar

You may have heard Yann Tiersen’s beautiful piano piece entitled Comptine D’un Autre Été, L’apres-Midi before. The song featured first in the French film Amélie, released in 2001. It then went on to get big international recognition and feature in Italian and German movies. If you have a particularly sharp ear, you may have picked up on the BBC using it in their programmes The Apprentice, and The Restaurant.

Pretty beautiful, huh? In my opinion it’s one of the best piano pieces out there. I know it’s a little down for the start of a weekend, but hey, everyone should hear this, and there’s absolutely no time like the present. My thoughts are with Japan.

Strobe (Adagio In D Minor) – John Murphy

17 Feb

So since there hasn’t been any classical for a while, I thought I’d maybe give you some soundtrack music. Hans Zimmer’s Time from Inception was the last soundtrack on here, and it’s epic, so maybe it’s time to explore a little more. The first song is super cool. It appeared in the movie Sunshine, and is called Strobe (Adagio in D Minor). It’s the only song I would ever want to be playing in the background as I got ready to try something outrageous in order to save the world, or sprint out of a burning building in glorious super super slo-mo. Check it out:

As an added bonus for you, here’s Flying Home by Marius Vries, Ilan Eshkeri, Henry Jackman, and John Murphy. I know that’s a lot of names, but even though this song is short, it’s awesome. The strings and electric guitars blend really well, and although it’s not perhaps on the same level of epic as Time, it’s certainly not far off.

Does it maybe surprise you that both of these songs are from the score of the movie Kick-Ass? Good music is good music…

Clubbed to Death – Rob Dougan

31 Oct

As well as a love of music, my other passion in life comes from film, making them and watching. One of the most revolutionary films of the decade love it or hate it, before it went of the rails, was The Matrix. and from that comes one of the most musically remembered scenes of all time, the girl in the red dress as its affectionately known to its fans. the song is the work of mind of Rob Dougan, Clubbed to Death is the song which in just a few opening bars turns your world upside down.

The song opens with Edward Elgar and Gustav Holst before twisting the world round into a carefully constructed web of electronic with frequent returns from both of the classical composers. It’s the way the tune is managed into a skilful and precise nature while delivering a mix of electronic symphonies that blends around you and incarcerates you in this tangle of utter brilliance.

It’s a song like no other and just like the film deserves landmark recognition for being simply magnificent and influential along every track of electronic music since. Here’s another of his tracks, Furious Angels enjoy…

Look out for more posts with our shenanigans in film-making coming very soon.

Artists you might like: Steve Jablonsky, Craig Armstrong and Clint Mansell.

Every Breath You Take – Scala & Kolacny Brothers

26 Oct

scala.jpg image by Saltlick

The Social Network was a fantastic movie, tightly written and excellently paced. But they say that behind every great movie is a great trailer. And this was no exception. For me, The Social Network‘s trailer stood out as innovatively produced with the hauntingly observations about our use of Facebook. What really had an affect was the song playing. Seemingly a staple of the Autumn trailers, a childrens’ choir can be heard singing along to Creep. It’s a wonderful cover of a song that has been covered a wondrous number of times. There are more reasons to listen to the song rather than as one youtuber would have us believe, ‘I love hearing little girls say the f-word.’

Here’s the trailer:

The choir behind that are Scala & Kolacny Brothers. Their repertoire is huge but my favourite is their rendition of The Police‘s Every Breath You Take. (This also had the (dubious) pleasure of appearing on an advert for ITV.) That youtuber, although crude, was onto something. They manage to subvert unexpectedly the whole sentiment of the song. Listening to a group of girls sing about stalking someone produces a haunting and reservedly beautiful song.

Here’s the song:

And if you were wondering, the trailer which I think is really quite effective:

Gregor Samsa Is Dead, Long Live Gregor Samsa – Asfandyar Khan

9 Oct

Snow Makes Things Perfect Cover Art

From Islamabad, Pakistan comes a soothing and thought-provoking EP by artist Asfandyar Khan. Snow Makes Things Perfect is his first piece of work, and on the EP are six different songs, each possessing a quality that separates them in both more and less obvious ways from the other tracks on the EP. This is my first taste of really any kind of music from Pakistan, and its sweet. Throughout this EP, there is the classic element that is contained within almost all instrumental music: swelling. These songs gradually grow and then flourish before your ears, making for beautiful music. In one or two places however, you’ll be surprised at what happens, and this is totally refreshing.

This song, Gregor Samsa Is Dead, Long Live Gregor Samsa is my favorite on the EP. If you listen, in the background you can pick up the soft noise of what sounds like a train or factory, or it could be just city noises. The juxtaposition of this and the soft acoustic riff that plays beautifully yet softly makes for an intriguing opening to the song and reels you in for the duration. In terms of the title of the song, Gregor Samsa is a fictional character in The Metamorphosis, a novel by Franz Kafka, and unfortunately that’s the extent of my knowledge on the subject. We’ll definitely be looking to see what Asfandyar Khan comes up with in future, and if you want to get his music visit his website.

Here’s a video with some beautiful footage, and another song of his called Hello Morocco:


Time – Hans Zimmer

18 Sep

Okay, maybe it’s a little unusual, but if any piece of classical music is good enough to feature on a blog, this is it. German composer Hans Zimmer has helped produce soundtracks to over 100 films over the course of 3 decades. It’s safe to say that he knows what he’s doing. Each soundtrack is incredible and fits the film staggeringly well, and there are always at least one or two absolute gems to be heard.

This track, entitled Time, is from the recent movie Inception. It’s an epic song and the strings swell beautifully with an piano accompaniment. Near the climax, horns are blasting and it just makes for something incredible. I would just put this on and sit back and listen…


Then again, if classical music isn’t your thing, never fear. You know we like to look after you over here, so here’s an awesome remix of the song to enjoy:

Time – Hans Zimmer (We Plants Are Happy Plants Remix):